Collection Coloring Book

Learn about artworks in the Center’s Collection while creating your own masterpiece.

The Center for Art in Wood Collection Coloring Book

A few of the Center’s favorites are ready for your artistic interpretation. Get your crayons, get your markers, get your glitter — get started!

Download & Print Single Coloring Sheets

Walking Stool

Walking Stool

Neil Donovan, 1990. Mahogany, oak, maple, suede, leather lace, and antique shoemaker lasts.

 

“Little did I know in 1990 as I worked on Walking Stool that I was making the signature piece of my career. The piece found its way into many 1990s publications, most notably, the cover of the original Wood Turning Center catalog of its collection; thank you Albert LeCoff. This was a very big deal for me at the time and it remains so. While I am happy that the concepts keep coming and my hands and eyes are still able to produce, it requires a lot of faith to anticipate another such spark.” — Neil Donovan


DOWNLOAD A PRINTABLE PDF

View in the Collection Catalog

 
Spiral Box

 

Spiral Box

Louise Hibbert, 2001. Sycamore, resin, ink, and texture paste.

 

“[My] inspiration has always [come from] a fascination with the natural world, particularly marine life, microscopic creatures, plants and fossils, which together offer a fantastic repertoire of imagery…The majority of my work is made from native kiln-dried timbers. Sycamore is my favourite as it has a pale, even grain to act as a blank canvas for my design and a wonderful translucent quality that makes the colours.” — Louise Hibbert

 


DOWNLOAD A PRINTABLE PDF

View in the Collection Catalog

Spud, the Potato Peeler's Stool

Spud, the Potato Peeler’s Stool

C.R. “Skip” Johnson, 1987. Walnut and leather.

C.R. “Skip” Johnson’s work is characteristically whimsical. “Spud” has an intentionally built-in squeak that can be heard when the piece is rolled across a room!


 

DOWNLOAD A PRINTABLE PDF

View in the Collection Catalog

Dancing Tryclops

Dancing Tryclops

Michael Brolly, 1996. Curly maple and dyed veneer.

Created during the Center’s 1996 International Turning Exchange (ITE) residency program.


 

DOWNLOAD A PRINTABLE PDF

View in the Collection Catalog

Bowl with Lid

Bowl with Lid

Walter Balliet, 1983. Maple and padauk.

 

DOWNLOAD A PRINTABLE PDF

View in the Collection Catalog

Trumpot

Trumpot

Mark Sfirri and Michael Hosaluk, 1996. Maple and paint.

“This was our second collaborative teapot. Michael [Hosaluk] made the pot and legs. When I studied it, I responded to the spherical shape. It reminded me of a balloon that was stretched to its limits and wanted to let out the air. I pictured a trumpet shape instead of a narrow pout for a teapot. From there the illusion grew with a mouthpiece and two valves. The painted imagery is meant to give emotion to the ‘figure.’ The typically unrelated objects of trumpet and teapot are brought together to create a new object that evokes humor and whimsy.” — Mark Sfirri


 

DOWNLOAD A PRINTABLE PDF

View in the Collection Catalog

Nail Fetish for the ITE

Nail Fetish for the ITE

Robin Rice, Friedrich Kuhn, and Gordon Ward, 1983. Ebony sawdust, acrylic/oil paints, nails, epoxy resin, varnish.

“In the Congo, a nail fetish, or ‘nkisi,’ is a power figure carved of wood. It is often elaborated with fiber and other materials and covered with oil. An opening in the stomach holds substances that activate the fetish’s magic. An ‘nkisi’ can protect, perform therapeutic rites, divine, and help maintain balance in the community. Hammering in a nail or a wedge of metal activates its power.” — Robin Rice


 

DOWNLOAD A PRINTABLE PDF

View in the Collection Catalog

Untitled

 

Untitled

Ray Allen, 1993. Various woods.

 


 

DOWNLOAD A PRINTABLE PDF

View in the Collection Catalog

Fastball

Fastball

Michael Brolly, 2000. Walnut, purpleheart, and cherry.

 

DOWNLOAD A PRINTABLE PDF

View in the Collection Catalog

Prepare to Puzzle!

Can you reassemble Jack Larimore’s work, Natural Desire?

Match this:

Support Your Favorite Programming at the Center

The Center for Art in Wood is able to provide an impressive array of programs and services thanks to support from our patrons. Please make a donation to help us continue creating unique educational materials like our Collection Coloring Book.