Christina Day

Christina Day

As an artist who thinks of pattern-making as a way to build and cover, I identified with the combination of simultaneous engineering and improvising that Lincoln Seitzman developed in his studio practice to create his basket illusions. Studying his work here in the Museum Collection shed some answers I had lingering in my own studio practice of how to truly end a repeat pattern. As a textile thinker, my work has a unique and specific relationship to how motifs and pieces end, physically. I chose the most formal of his pieces The Center for Art and Wood had on record to respond to as I found myself to be more interested in the sum of the method, rather than the whole of the thing, as an object of illusion.

In response, I hand cut and re-aligned the color separations of a vintage kitchen wallpaper plaid back into a superimposed version of itself – a nod to the puzzle-like building method Seitzman established to create his pieces. I am interested in the signature my craft hand has, glitches included, which is why I cut by hand. I have a deep appreciation for detailed handwork and the level of energy and charge thorough workmanship can inject into a piece.